Delightful Art Installations in Omihachiman, Shiga

Recently, I went to the Biwako Biennale (English page) in Omihachiman, Shiga. If you’re in the area, you can go too! It’s running until November 11, 2018.

First of all, Omihachiman is a charming little town, worth the trip by itself. There’s a reason you’ll find essentially this same picture, taken by a hundred other people — it’s a beautiful view that isn’t hard to enjoy.

Lovely canal!

Our main destination that day, though, was the Biwako Biennale, an art installation festival going on throughout Omihachiman. For ¥2,200, we got admission to a variety of very cool art installations.

These were generally built into old houses or other old buildings — these art installation biennales and triennales are becoming fairly popular throughout Japan, especially in smaller towns where dropping populations are leading to vacant buildings.

Some of the exhibits are full-scale installations that simply must be visited to be properly enjoyed (such as the hanging lights near the top, or this one above), but some of them were collections of smaller items. For instance, this next photo is one of several similar items; though it looks like a jar or vase or something wrapped in a cloth, the whole thing — “cloth” and all — is made of clay.

And then there was this large, impressive work. Perhaps the most impressive aspect was the fact that every part of it was made out of food. The bags below, in fact, contain examples of some of the seeds and other items used in the sculpture above.

If you have the chance, I absolutely recommend visiting for yourself! It’s still running for another week or so, and these photos only scratch the surface. A lot of the exhibits can only be properly experienced in person, so I didn’t even try to photograph them! And some of them, well… some of them are at least sort of expressed in video, but they’re still a lot more fun in person too.

菓子パン

“菓子パン”は、菓子なのかパンなのか。わからない。

驚かされるのが、そのカロリーと脂質。

たとえば、これら↓

某クッキー(菓子パン)
1個当たり 520 kcal 脂質 34 g

某デニッシュ
1個当たり 864 kcal 脂質 38.3 g

牛丼並盛 が 650 kcal 脂質 17g 程度だから、油断して菓子パン食べるとデブまっしぐらです。
成人男性では、1日の適正な脂質の量は55 g 程度とされるので、お昼に某クッキー1個食べただけで、もう夕食はほとんど脂質が取れない。。

小腹を満たすどころではない。

学生の頃に、毎日某クッキーを食べていて、運動してるわりに全然痩せないなぁと感じていた時期がありました…

ただ、こういった菓子パンらは、登山の際の栄養補給食品としてよく売れているらしい。
マラソンの直前にカステラをたくさん食べたりするし。要は用途次第。間違えてはいけない。

コスモス畑

先日、となみ夢の平のコスモス畑に行ってきました。

ちょうど満開の時期で、約100万本の美しいコスモスに圧倒されました。

ここは冬はスキー場なので、リフトに乗ってコスモスを眺めることもできます。

リフトは、結構揺れて少し怖い思いをしましたが..笑

秋を感じる良い1日となりました。

実績紹介/横濱家系らーめん 元喜家様 券売機メニュー

金沢市や高岡市など多くの店舗がある横濱家系らーめん 元喜家様の券売機横に設置するメニュー表示を翻訳させていただきました。

言語は、英語、中国語簡体字、中国語繁体字(台湾向け)、韓国語の4言語です。

個人的に以前からよく行くお店でしたし、周りにもファンが多いお店でしたので、とても印象的なお仕事になりました。

こちらのラーメン、とっても美味しいですよ♪

The Spirit of the Old Edo Lives On… through Shopping

They say that back in the days of the Tokugawa shogunate, the feudal lords (or daimyo) from throughout Japan would alternate spending a year in Edo (now Tokyo) and spending a year at home.

This is the sort of fact that feels like it could be, but almost certainly isn’t, related to the “antenna shops” of Tokyo.

Bridge Niigata

Word is that Tokyo’s “antenna shops,” or shops dedicated to specific prefectures, began to spring up in the early 1990s. Today, these shops can be found in clusters around Tokyo, mainly in Ginza and the adjacent Yurakucho, but they can also be found in other areas of town, too: there are a few in Nihonbashi and Aoyama, as well.

Mie Terrace

These shops generally offer a selection of foods and snacks from the prefecture in question, as well as a collection of local sake and other products: for instance, Toyama’s antenna shop features tin items from Nousaku, as well as binzasara, a type of traditional musical instrument. Nara’s offers local pickled vegetables. Fukui’s offers heshiko preserved mackerel. These stores offer quite a range of items, including, in one case, wooden dressers and chests of drawers(!).

Mahoroba Nara

Some of these shops can be quite sizable: the one for Ishikawa, for example, is three stories(!), continuing up to the second floor and down into the basement.

Ishikawa Antenna Shop

Interestingly, though these are relatively prevalent in Tokyo, they can occasionally be seen elsewhere: in Kyoto and Osaka, for example, I’ve seen stores dedicated to Shiga, Okinawa, and the prefectures on the island of Shikoku.

On the other hand, I do feel like maybe Eataly in Nihonbashi doesn’t quite count as an antenna shop, as thematically appropriate as it may be.

Eataly Nihonbashi is not nearly as large as the one in New York, but still pretty good

If you can’t make it out of Tokyo, these shops are a fun way to get at least a taste of the rest of the country — or, if you miss the unique specialties of elsewhere in Japan, a taste of home.